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How Quinta Brunson Carved Her Unique Path To Stardom

Source: Alberto Rodriguez / Getty

Quinta Brunson is a dynamic and trailblazing entertainer whose meteoric rise in the entertainment industry is nothing short of awe-inspiring. With her razor-sharp wit, infectious personality and unapologetic authenticity, Brunson has carved her own path to stardom. From her early days as a Vine sensation to her current status as a Hollywood powerhouse, Brunson’s journey is a testament to her talent, perseverance and unwavering passion for her craft.

Before she made history at the 2022 Emmys and broke primetime TV with her incredible show Abbott Elementary, Brunson’s career started from humble beginnings.

Born on December 21, 1989, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the multi-talented star developed her love for comedy and storytelling at a young age. She honed her skills while attending Temple University, where she studied theater. However, it was her breakthrough on the now-defunct social media platform Vine that catapulted her to internet stardom.

With her relatable and hilarious videos that often depicted everyday situations with a comedic twist, Brunson quickly gained a massive following on Vine. Success peaked for the internet sensation after she released several short videos titled The Girl Who’s Never Been on a Nice Date in 2014. The hilarious series quickly put Brunson on the map for her signature catchphrase “He Got Money.” The Philly native’s funny series earned her millions of fans and widespread recognition.

 

Transitioning to Television and Digital.

Quinta Brunson’s success on Vine opened doors for her in the entertainment industry. She made the transition to television and digital platforms, continuing to make a name for herself. In 2014, she joined BuzzFeed as a development partner, where she starred in and produced content for popular web series like Quinta vs. Everything and BuzzfeedViolet.

But the showrunner and producer struck gold in 2016 when she launched her hit web series Broke alongside Maurice Williams and Paul Dupree. The 11-episode series followed the ups and downs of the trio’s lives as they worked to fulfill their dreams living in L.A. Brunson’s comedic web series became so big that eventually, she sold the show to YouTube Red.

In 2019, Quinta parted ways with Buzzfeed, but there wasn’t any ill will between her and the network.

“For me, it was time to leave when my ambitions kind of became different than just working a nine to five requesting time off to do things like to write on a TV show, that conflicted with keeping a nine to five job,” Brunson confessed on her YouTube channel in 2021. “Honestly for me, it felt like college and you have to graduate from college and I think it was really just time for me to graduate in my world. I had no negative experience that made me want to leave, “ the star continued.

“I feel fortunate to have had the experience. I feel fortunate to have been able to support myself and not only myself but others. I was able to support a lot of other young black creators that otherwise may have never had a chance getting into this industry.”

Brunson’s talent and perseverance eventually led her to Hollywood, where she made her mark as a sought-after actress and comedian. She landed roles in popular TV shows such as A Black Lady Sketch Show, iZombie and Single Parents, showcasing her versatility and comedic timing.

In addition to her success in front of the camera, Brunson has also made a name for herself behind the scenes. She has written and produced for TV shows like the short-lived Quinta & Jermaine on CBS and AdultSwim’s Lazor Wulf, demonstrating her skills as a multi-talented creator.

Now. Brunson shines on her hit ABC sitcom Abbott Elementary. In the mockumentary-styled series, Brunson stars as the happy-go-lucky Janine Teagues, an optimistic second-grade teacher who has a mission to help the lives of her students. Based in a Philadelphia public school, Teagues and all of Abbott’s dedicated staff fight to put their student’s education first, even when underfunding and poor educational policies make things difficult. 

Brunson, 33, drew inspiration for the show from real-life experience. During an interview with NPR in 2022, the famous content creator shared that her mother worked at a public school that lacked the financial resources to help teachers, but growing up, she admired the way her mom continued to teach with passion and zeal.

“Despite it getting harder, despite teachers not having all the support they need, despite kids growing even more unruly than they’ve been in recent times … she still loved the job,” Brunson explained of her mother’s resilience. ”The beauty is someone being so resilient for a job that is so underpaid and so underappreciated because it makes them feel fulfilled.”

The hit ABC sitcom is named after her sixth-grade teacher Ms. Abbott, who took her “under her wing” and helped her to see the world in a different way.

Since launching in 2021, Abbott Elementary has gone on to make history. At the Emmys last year, Quinta Brunson took home the award for Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series, which made her the third Black writer and the second Black female writer to win the award.

Quinta Brunson’s journey from Vine to Hollywood is a testament to her extraordinary talent, hard work and unwavering determination. She has defied expectations, broken barriers, and carved her own path in the entertainment industry, becoming a trailblazer and an inspiration to many. With her undeniable talent, unique perspective and unapologetic authenticity, Brunson continues to leave her mark on the entertainment world, and her future prospects are boundless. We eagerly anticipate what this rising star will achieve next in her already illustrious career.

SEE ALSO:

Quinta Brunson Extends Her Warner Bros. TV Partnership With Multi-Year Overall Deal

Jimmy Kimmel Messed Up Quinta Brunson’s Historic Emmy Moment And Black Twitter Wasn’t Having It

How Quinta Brunson Carved Her Unique Path To Stardom  was originally published on newsone.com